Uncluttering for the New Year

A New Year awaits! As always, the turning of the calendar makes me want to clear the slate. How about you? What are you purging from your life in preparation for the New Year?

Here are some posts related to Uncluttering:

~ Why I Don’t Keep Books: Here

~ Church Clutter: Here and Here

~ Ruth Getting Philosophical About “Stuff”: Here and Here

~ A Writer Attempts to Unclutter: Here and Here 

~ My Attempt at Zen: I’m Glad It Broke

~ My 2012 Mantra: Close the Loop

One Bag Travel – a guest blogger takes a humorous look

Clutter Creep!

~ and let me give Jesus the final word, because this is the heart of why I like to unclutter:

Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust consume and where thieves break in and steal; but store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust consumes and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.   Matthew 6:19-21

Thanks for reading my blog, and best wishes to you in 2014!

Happy Uncluttering!

About Ruth Everhart

I'm a writer and a minister. I believe that work is never wasted, especially creative work. I wrote a book about a pilgrimage to Israel/Palestine called "Chasing the Divine in the Holy Land." Now I'm working on a spiritual memoir. I love the work!
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2 Responses to Uncluttering for the New Year

  1. Ruth Kent says:

    I hadn’t read some of the earlier posts you list, so I went back and read them all. For reflection, some other perspectives on the Ming bowl (“My Attempt at Zen”). One reason to be glad it broke is that you never have to worry about that again, like the first scratch or dent on a new car. It can now be enjoyed without anxiety. Separate what the bowl meant to you from whatever material value it had. Breaking the bowl is not equivalent to breaking its spiritual and emotional value to you as a reminder that someone valued your ministry; it can still serve as that reminder that your work was cherished. Find what is still beautiful about it, the designs, the color. We are all broken and glued back together throughout life and we don’t lose our value or beauty as humans, as beloved children of God, because of that. We are never glued back together perfectly and our lives show the seams, but those can be a form of beauty in their own right. So take the pieces out of the box, glue it together, and put it back out where you can see it. Remember that you are cherished in all your brokenness and that putting piecesback together, even imperfectly, is part of what we are called to do, for ourselves and for others.

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